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How to say I don’t need a plastic bag in all 11 official SA languages

Found in: Blog

a plastic bag is made of thin, flexible plastic material, especially one with handles supplied by a shop to carry goods purchased there.

Plastic bags are so lightweight and aerodynamic, that even if we dispose of them properly, they can escape with the wind. They escape from our trash cans, garbage trucks and landfills and they go where the wind takes them.

Here is a list of How to say I don’t need a plastic bag in all 11 official South African languages.

1 English

I don’t need a plastic bag,  I brought my own.

2 Afrikaans

Ek het  nie ’n plastieksak nodig  nie, ek het  my eie gebring.

3 Ndebele

Angidingiitjhwaratjhwara nginayo yami

4 Xhosa

Andifuni ngxowanayeplastiki yokuphatha, sendinayo eyam.

5 Zulu

Angisidingi isikhwamasepulastiki, ngiziphathele esami.

6 Sepedi

Ga ke tsome mokotlana waplastik, ke tlile le wa ka.

7 Sesotho

Ha ke hloke mokotlana wa polasetiki, ke tlile le wa ka

8 Setswana

Ga ke tlhoke kgetsanyana yapolasetiki, ke itletse ka tsa  me.

9 Siswati

Angisidzingi sikhwamaselipulasitiki, ngite  nesami.

10 Tshivenda

A thi ṱoḓi puḽasitiki, ndo ḓa na yanga.

11 Xitsonga

A ndzi lavi pulasitikibege, ndzi tile na ya mina.

Where can I buy airtime in all 11 official SA languages

Found in: Blog

Airtime is the actual timer subscribers spend talking on their cellular phones. Many cell phone plans are based
on the number of airtime minutes that can be used each month.

Pay-As-You-Go plans, for example, allows cellphone owners to pay in advance for talk time, and add add more airtime as needed, by day, week or month..

Prepaid airtime is great for teenagers. It allows them to have a cell phone for emergency use or to simply inform their parents of their whereabouts.

Here is a list of how to ask Where can I buy airtime? in all 11 official South African languages.

1 English

Where  can  I buy airtime?

2 English

Waar kan ek lugtyd koop?

3 Ndebele

Ngingawathengakuphi amaminidi wokufowuna?

4 Xhosa

Ndingawuthenga phi umoyakanomyayi?

5 Zulu

Ngingawuthengaphiumoya kamakhalekhukhwini?

6 Sepedi

Nka reka  kae airtime?

7 Sesotho

Ebe nka reka moya  wa mohala hokae?

8 Setswana

Nka reka  kae metsotso yago letsa ya selefounu?

9 Siswati

Ngingawutsenga kuphi umoyawamakhale- khukhwini?

10 Tshivenda

Ndi nga  rengangafhi  muya/ airtime?

11 Xitsonga

Xana moya wa selifoni ndzi nga wu xava  kwihi?

How-to-ask-for-the -bathroom-in-all-11-official-SA-languages

Found in: Blog

A bathroom, also known as a restroom, waste extraction, toilet facility is a room that generally
contains a toilet, and may also contain any of the following: sink, shower/sonic shower or a bath tub.

These fixtures are then connected to a sewage and waste reclamation system where they are recycled..

This is one of the most important things you need to know, how to ask for the bathroom in all 11 official SA languages.

Imagine needing a bathroom and unable to ask for directions to one!

Here is a list of how to ask for the  bathroom in all 11 official South African languages.

1 English

Where  is the  bathroom?

2 Afrikaans

Waar is die badkamer?

3 Ndebele

Ikuphi indlwanayokuqophela; yokuhlambela?

4 Xhosa

Liphi igumbi lokuhlambela?

5 Zulu

Ikuphi indlu yokugezela?

6 Sepedi

Na phapoši ya bohlapelo e kae?

7 Sesotho

Kamore ya ho hlapela e hokae?

8 Setswana

Botlhapelo bo fa kae?

9 Siswati

Likuphi ligumbi lekugezela?

10 Tshivenda

Kamara ya uṱambela i ngafhi?

11 Xitsonga

Xana kamarayo hlambela yi le kwihi?

How to ask for a road map in all 11 official SA languages

Found in: Blog

A road map is a map designed for motorists, showing the principal cities and towns of a state or
area, usually tourist attractions and places of historical interest, and the mileage from one place to another.

Whether you are planning a trip to another city, town, village or country, a road map will show you how to get there.

Here is a list of how to ask for a road map in all 11 official South African languages.

1 English

Do you have a road map?

2 Afrikaans

Het jy ’n padkaart?

3 Ndebele

Unawo ummebhewendlela na?

4 Xhosa

Unayo imephu yeendlela?

5 Zulu

Unayo imephu yomgwaqo?

6 Sepedi

O na le mmepe wa tsela?

7 Sesotho

Na o na le mmapa wa tsela?

8 Setswana

A o na le mmepe wa tsela?

9 Siswati

Unalo yini libalave lemgwaco?

10 Tshivenda

Ni na mapa wazwiṱaraṱa?

11 Xitsonga

Xana u nawona mepe wo komba patu?

Reading has at all times and in all ages been a great source of knowledge. Today the ability to read is highly valued and very important for social and economic advancement. In today’s world with so much more to know and to learn and also the need for a conscious effort to conquer the divisive forces, the importance of reading has increased.

Found in: Blog

Everyone knows that reading is important, but have you ever asked yourself why that is so?

Reading has at all times and in all ages been a great source of knowledge. Today the ability to read is highly valued and very important for social and economic advancement.
In today’s world with so much more to know and to learn and also the need for a conscious effort to conquer the divisive forces, the importance of reading has increased.

Reading is an integral part of life and it’s difficult imagining life without it.

Here is a list of how to say I enjoy reading in all 11 official South African languages.

1 English

I enjoy reading

2 Afrikaans

Ek hou van lees

3 Ndebele

ngithanda ukufunda

4 Xhosa

ndiyakuthanda ukufunda

5 Zulu

ngiyathanda ukufunda izincwadi

6 Sepedi

ke ipshina ka go bala

7 Sesotho

ke rata bo bala

8 Setswana

ke rata go buisa

9 Siswati

ngiyakutsandza kufundza

10 Tshivenda

ndi takalela u vhala

11 Xitsonga

ndzi rhandza ku hlaya

How to say goodbye in all 11 official South African languages

Found in: Blog

Goodbyes can be complicated. They can be heartfelt, full of sorrow. They can be casual among friends, or formal among work colleagues. We can say goodbye knowing we’ll never see someone again, or we can say goodbye knowing we’ll see them again tomorrow.

Goodbye’s the saddest word you’ll ever hear. It’s also the saddest word you’ll ever say. Saying goodbye sucks, and is absolutely, 100% terrifying.

Here is a list of how to say goodbye in all 11 official South African languages.

1 English

goodbye

2 Afrikaans

totsiens

3 Ndebele

usale kuhle (stay well) // uhambe kuhle (go well)

4 Xhosa

sala kakuhle (stay well) // hamba kakuhle (go well)

5 Zulu

sala kahle (stay well) // hamba kahle (go well)

6 Sepedi

šala gabotse (stay well) // sepela gabotse (go well)

7 Sesotho

sala hantle (stay well) // tsamaya hantle (go well)

8 Setswana

sala sentle (stay well) // tsamaya sentle (go well)

9 Siswati

sala kahle (stay well) // hamba kahle (go well)

10 Tshivenda

kha vha sale zwavhudi

11 Xitsonga

salani

How to say you are invited to my birthday in all 11 SA languages

Found in: Blog

A birthday is the date on which a person was born. It is customary in many cultures to celebrate the anniversary of one’s birthday in some way, for example by having a birthday party with friends in which gifts are given.

It is also customary to treat someone especially well and generally accede to their wishes on their birthday.

Birthdays come and go, everyone grows up a year every year, and gifts are opened and thrown.

Here is a list of how to say you are invited to my birthday party in all 11 official South African languages.

1 English

you are invited to my birthday party

2 Afrikaans

jy word na my partytjie genool

3 Ndebele

umnyelwa elangeni lami lamabeletho

4 Xhosa

uyamenywa kumsitho womhla wokuzalwa kwam

5 Zulu

ngiyakumema sizogubha usuku lokuzalwa kwami

6 Sepedi

o mengwa monyanyaneng wa letšatši la matswalo a ka

7 Sesotho

ke o memela moketeng wa letsatsi la ka la tswalo

8 Setswana

o lalediwa go tla moletlong wa me wa botsalo

9 Siswati

umenyiwe lelusuku lwami lwekutalwa

10 Tshivenda

no rambiwa vhuṱamboni ha ḓuvha ḽanga ḽa mabebo

11 Xitsonga

ndzi ku rhamba eka nkhuvu wo tlangela siku ra mina ra ku velekiwa

How to say I don't know in all 11 South African languages

Found in: Blog

The phrase ‘I don’t know‘ is used when you are letting someone know that you are not sure about what is being asked. You may also have no knowledge or opinion on a topic.

When someone asks you a question, of course, they want an answer. Our problem is, that sometimes we don’t have an answer for them, and saying “I don’t know” is not good enough.

Here is a list of how to say I don’t know in all 11 official South African languages.

1 English

I don't know

2 Afrikaans

ek weet nie

3 Ndebele

angazi

4 Xhosa

andazi

5 Zulu

angazi

6 Sepedi

ga ke tsebe

7 Sesotho

Ha ke tsebe

8 Setswana

ga ke itse

9 Siswati

angati

10 Tshivenda

a thi ḓivhi

11 Xitsonga

a ndzi tivi

how to say I am hungry in all 11 South African languages

Found in: Blog

Hunger is defined as the ‘need for food‘. Your body lets you know you’re running low on fuel and that a meal is needed to provide your body with the necessary energy (food) it needs to perform an activity.

We need to eat because the nutrients in food is what causes our body to work! It gives us energy, helps us grow, and makes sure that all of our organs perform like they should.

Here is a list of how to say I am hungry in all 11 official South African languages.

1 English

I'm hungry

2 Afrikaans

ek is honger

3 Ndebele

ngilambile

4 Xhosa

ndilambile

5 Zulu

ngilambile

6 Sepedi

ke swere ke tlala

7 Sesotho

ke lapile

8 Sesotho

ke tshwerwe ke tlala

9 Siswati

ngilambile

10 Tshivenda

ndi na nḓala

11 Xitsonga

ndzi na ndlala

ow to ask: what is your name? in all 11 official SA languages

Found in: Blog

A name is a word or set of words by which a person or thing is known, addressed, or referred to.

People have names for identification purposes and also for referencing lineage.

We meet new people wherever we go. We can be hesitant in asking people their name because we are self conscious.

Sometimes there are situations when we have already met the person but forgotten their name.

Here is a list of How to ask people’s names in all 11 official South African languages.

1 English

What is your name?

2 Afrikaans

Wat is jou naam?

3 Ndebele

ungubani ibizo lakho?

4 Xhosa

ungubani igama lakho?

5 Zulu

ubani igama lakho?

6 Sepedi

leina la gago ke mang?

7 Sesotho

lebitso la hao ke mang?

8 Setswana

leina la gago ke mang?

9 Siswati

Ngubani ligama lakho?

10 Tshivenda

dzina ḽaṋu ndi nnyi?

11 Xitsonga

xana i mani vito ra wena?