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Did you know

  • English was declared the official language of the Cape Colony in 1822 (replacing Dutch)
  • South Africa's Asian people, most of whom are Indian in origin, are largely English-speaking
  • Today, English is South Africa's lingua franca, and the primary language of government, business, and commerce
  • According to the 2011 census, English is spoken as a home language by almost 5- million people
  • As a home language, English is most common in Gauteng
  • Around half of South Africa's people have a speaking knowledge of English

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X y Z

Language: English

O, the fifteenth letter of the English alphabet, derives its form, value, and name from the Greek O, through the Latin. The letter came into the Greek from the Ph/nician, which possibly derived it ultimately from the Egyptian. Etymologically, the letter o is most closely related to a, e, and u; as in E. bone, AS. ban; E. stone, AS. stan; E. broke, AS. brecan to break; E. bore, AS. beran to bear; E. dove, AS. d/fe; E. toft, tuft; tone, tune; number, F. nombre.

Language: English

A prefix to Irish family names, which signifies grandson or descendant of, and is a character of dignity; as, O’Neil, O’Carrol.

Language: English

(n.) See Woad.

Language: English

(n.) Originally, an elf’s child; a changeling left by fairies or goblins; hence, a deformed or foolish child; a simpleton; an idiot.

Language: English

(a.) Like an oaf; simple.

Language: English

(n.) Any tree or shrub of the genus Quercus. The oaks have alternate leaves, often variously lobed, and staminate flowers in catkins. The fruit is a smooth nut, called an acorn, which is more or less inclosed in a scaly involucre called the cup or cupule. There are now recognized about three hundred species, of which nearly fifty occur in the United States, the rest in Europe, Asia, and the other parts of North America, a very few barely reaching the northern parts of South America and Africa. Many of the oaks form forest trees of grand proportions and live many centuries. The wood is usually hard and tough, and provided with conspicuous medullary rays, forming the silver grain.

Language: English

(a.) Made or consisting of oaks or of the wood of oaks.

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X y Z