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How to say goodbye in all 11 official South African languages

Found in: Blog

Goodbyes can be complicated. They can be heartfelt, full of sorrow. They can be casual among friends, or formal among work colleagues. We can say goodbye knowing we’ll never see someone again, or we can say goodbye knowing we’ll see them again tomorrow.

Goodbye’s the saddest word you’ll ever hear. It’s also the saddest word you’ll ever say. Saying goodbye sucks, and is absolutely, 100% terrifying.

Here is a list of how to say goodbye in all 11 official South African languages.

1 English

goodbye

2 Afrikaans

totsiens

3 Ndebele

usale kuhle (stay well) // uhambe kuhle (go well)

4 Xhosa

sala kakuhle (stay well) // hamba kakuhle (go well)

5 Zulu

sala kahle (stay well) // hamba kahle (go well)

6 Sepedi

šala gabotse (stay well) // sepela gabotse (go well)

7 Sesotho

sala hantle (stay well) // tsamaya hantle (go well)

8 Setswana

sala sentle (stay well) // tsamaya sentle (go well)

9 Siswati

sala kahle (stay well) // hamba kahle (go well)

10 Tshivenda

kha vha sale zwavhudi

11 Xitsonga

salani

ow to ask: what is your name? in all 11 official SA languages

Found in: Blog

A name is a word or set of words by which a person or thing is known, addressed, or referred to.

People have names for identification purposes and also for referencing lineage.

We meet new people wherever we go. We can be hesitant in asking people their name because we are self conscious.

Sometimes there are situations when we have already met the person but forgotten their name.

Here is a list of How to ask people’s names in all 11 official South African languages.

1 English

What is your name?

2 Afrikaans

Wat is jou naam?

3 Ndebele

ungubani ibizo lakho?

4 Xhosa

ungubani igama lakho?

5 Zulu

ubani igama lakho?

6 Sepedi

leina la gago ke mang?

7 Sesotho

lebitso la hao ke mang?

8 Setswana

leina la gago ke mang?

9 Siswati

Ngubani ligama lakho?

10 Tshivenda

dzina ḽaṋu ndi nnyi?

11 Xitsonga

xana i mani vito ra wena?

How to say pleased to meet you in all 11 official SA languages

Found in: Blog

The phrase “Pleased to meet you” is used When you meet someone for the first time while shaking their hand. Or when you’re saying goodbye to the newly-met person.

There are a number of greetings we use when meeting people. These greetings depend on whether we are meeting people, leaving people or meeting people for the first time.

First impressions are important, so here is a list of how to say pleased to meet you in all 11 official South African languages.

1 English

pleased to meet you

2 Afrikaans

lekker om jou te ontmoet

3 Ndebele

ngithabele ukuhlangana nawe

4 Xhosa

ndiyavuya ukukwazi

5 Zulu

ngiyajabula ukukwazi

6 Sepedi

ke thabela go go tseba

7 Sesotho

ke phetse hantle

8 Setswana

ke itumelela go go itse

9 Siswati

kuyangijabulisa kwatana nawe

10 Tshivenda

ndo takala u ṱangana na inwi

11 Xitsonga

ndzi tsakile ku hlangana na wema

How to say thank you in all 11 official SA languages

Found in: Blog

Why say thank you? Well, we do it partly because we’ve been taught from a young age that it is the right thing to do. We learn to say thank you to those who offer us help, who give things to us and who provide guidance or support.

We say thank you for gifts, thank you for special favors, and thank you for assistance in times of need. But it’s not only the big things where thank you matters. We also say thank you as we’re handed our change in the store, thank you to someone who holds the door for us, and thank you to the person who passes us the salt at dinner.

It’s a phrase that is pretty much ubiquitous. But it’s never unwelcome, and it can mean so much.

Here is a list of how to say thank you in all 11 official South African languages.

1 English

thank you

2 Afrikaans

dankie

3 Ndebele

ngiyathokoza

4 Xhosa

enkosi

5 Zulu

ngiyabonga

6 Sepedi

ke a leboga

7 Sesotho

ke a leboha

8 Setswana

ke a leboga

9 Siswati

ngiyabonga

10 Tshivenda

ndi a livhuha

11 Xitsonga

ndza Khensa

How to say good morning in all 11 South African languages

Found in: Blog

Good morning is a common phrase meaning the same thing as “hello” but it can only be used before midday. It does not necessarily assume the weather is good but is rather a simple greeting.

If you stay up all night long with friends and you find that it is 2 AM (or still dark) you can still say “Good Night”. It may be funny, The person may say “Good night” and look at their watch and laugh and say “or good morning!” It happens all the time!

Here is a list of how to say good morning in all 11 South African languages.

1 English

Good morning

2 Afrikaans

goeie môre

3 Ndebele

Lotjhani

4 Xhosa

Molweni

5 Zulu

Sawubona

6 Sepedi

Thobela

7 Sesotho

Dumela

8 Setswana

Dumela

9 Siswati

Sawubona

10 Tshivenda

Matsheloni avhudi

11 Xitsonga

Avuxeni

How to say good night in all 11 South African languages

Found in: Blog

“Good night” is a conventional expression of farewell, or, rarely, of greeting, used in the late afternoon, the evening, or at night, especially when departing to bed.

You say “Good night” to say “goodbye” – when you are leaving to go home. Family members also say “good night” when they are going to bed.

Here is a quick guide on how to say goodnight in all 11 official South African languages.

1 English

good night

2 Afrikaans

goeie nag

3 Ndebele

ulale kuhle // ubothongo obumnandi

4 Xhosa

busuku benzolo

5 Zulu

ulale kahle

6 Sepedi

robala gabotse

7 Sesotho

fonaneng // robala hantle

8 Setswana

robala sentle

9 Siswati

ulale kahle

10 Tshivenda

vhusiku havhudi

11 Xitsonga

ra ha perile